planting projects – tentree

Planting Projects

We plant in over 6 different countries around the world. Each planting site is unique and benefits from tree planting in different ways. Click below to learn more about our individual planting sites.

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3,833,222

acacia

persian silk

kapok

silky oak

teak

with Eden Reforestation since 2014.

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  • present
  • future

Nepal ranks among poorest countries on Earth, in part due to the fact that the country has lost a quarter of its forest cover in just the last 20 years. This deforestation made the effects of the 2015 magnitude 8.1 earthquake even worse by causing hillsides, once covered in trees, to easily break apart.

Working alongside our partners, we've planted thousands of trees in Nepal, particularly the mountainous areas in the Nawalparasi region, and grasslands close to Jhapa. In conjunction with planting, we're helping educate villagers on how to sustainably harvest lumber and care for their trees. Reforesting prevents mudslides in the future from both earthquakes and rainstorms.

Soil stabilization is our highest priority in Nepal, as landslides after the 2015 earthquake made the toll of the quake so much worse. Earthquakes will happen again in the region, so we aim to reforest as much of the populated areas as possible before the next one hits. Trees also provide an uplifting economic effect, to help reduce poverty in one of the world's poorest countries.

10,045,466

mangrove

with Eden Reforestation since 2012.

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  • present
  • future

Over 80% of Madagascar has been deforested in the recent decades. Due to being an isolated island, Madagascar is home to many animals that don’t exist anywhere else in the world. Due to the destruction of their habitats, these animals face being endangered - or worse - extinct. The removal of mangrove trees along the coast has left the island nation vulnerable to storm surges and considerable erosion. Further inland, desertification has also taken its toll. Before we began planting here, things seemed rather bleak.

Today, your trees counteract desertification and bring back homes for Madagascar's wildlife. They provide fuel and building material for the local villagers and fruit to feed them. We primarily plant mangrove trees which capture and filter more carbon dioxide than any other tree on the planet, being the most effective tree to fight climate change. The trees we plant in Madagascar don't just protect the environment, they protect the people too.

Once fully restored, Madagascar's mangroves will protect the nation's coastline from further erosion. They’ll sink tons of carbon into the soil, keeping the Earth habitable. With this restoration, fish and other wildlife will return, providing food for locals. Our trees will have also halted further desert encroachment, helping to protect vital farmland.

669,004

pine

eucalyptus

oak

avocado

oranges

with Plant with Purpose since 2015.

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  • present
  • future

Haiti is, unfortunately, better known for its internal strife than anything else. From civil conflicts to devastating natural disasters, life in Haiti is difficult. It's further complicated by the fact that the Caribbean nation has suffered extensive deforestation. Deforestation has been driven by a lack of sustainability practices and a need for wood to cook and keep warm.

Today, we're working with small villages and towns to plant trees that stabilize and replenish the soil while growing fruit. We also educate people on sustainable tree growing and harvesting practices to prevent a repeat of recent history, which will help to build a brighter future. The opportunity for additional income means children can attend school instead of working at a young age. The number of girls going to school has nearly doubled.

The trees we're planting in Haiti don't just provide environmental and economic benefits, but social benefits too. Locals often find themselves in conflict with the neighboring country of the Dominican Republic. Our nurseries bring people from both countries together. By continuing to plant in this area, we help break down and remedy social conflicts between the two peoples, building the promise for a peaceful and sustainable future.

7,832

persian silk

with Luc Forsyth since 2014.

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  • present
  • future

Since the 1960s, Cambodia has struggled with extreme internal conflict and severe corruption. As is often the case when a government is corrupt, the environment and the people suffer. Illegal logging has left the country's forests in shambles and there were little to no efforts to replant these forests.

Today, due to government restrictions, we have been unable to plant a significant number of trees on public lands, but this won't stop us. Instead, we're working with activists and Buddhist monks to plant and care for native trees being planted on the grounds of schools and temples across the country.

We are eager to hire tree planters in Cambodia to start undoing the damage done to their forests, but until serious government reform takes place, we will continue working with individuals on a much smaller scale.

2,429,309

mango

papaya

guava

with Trees for the Future since 2014.

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  • present
  • future

Senegal is a country that relies heavily on agriculture to make ends meet. One of the most common crops is peanuts, but growing peanuts is backbreaking work that pays poorly and saps the land of its nutrients. Over the last few decades, peanut farmers have cleared forests to open land for farming. After a few years of peanut farming, the soil is left infertile, and little will grow.

To help local farmers break the cycle of poverty caused by peanut farming, we have partnered with more than 200 farmers to plant agroforests, and to change crop choices from the unsustainable peanuts to sustainable fruits and vegetables. By planting mango, papaya, cashew, and guava trees, farmers have gone from not being able to feed their families, to being able to feed their families as well as other members of the town!

The trees we provide for farmers in Senegal take only 3-5 years to begin producing fruit. Once the trees have begun fruiting, these farmers will be able to make and income up to 6 times higher than they ever could by farming peanuts. Along with economic benefits, these fruits are healthier food than peanuts, helping to nourish the communities in which the trees grow. By continuing these successful agrofarms, more and more people catch on and will switch away from the unsustainable peanut farming to a sustainable, prosperous future.

76,924

pine

with City of Sudbury since 2015.

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  • present
  • future

Canada prides itself in responsible management of its forests and a great deal of effort is put into planting trees. Their deforestation rate is lower than most countries on the planet, but there's still loss due to fires and the logging industry.

tentree has partnered with a number of incredible organizations, like the Red Cross, Parks Canada, and others to participate in reforestation programs. We've reforested areas that have been illegally logged as well as cleared for mining.

We will continue our planting work in Canada in order to provide a healthy, safe, and clean environment not just for Canadians, but also for the wildlife that calls Canada home.

7,000

acacia

with American Forests.

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  • present
  • future

Prior to the arrival of Europeans in North America, nearly half of the United States was forested (approx. 4,000,000 square kilometres). Today, that number stands at just over 3,000,000 square kilometres - a decrease of over 25%. The majority of this deforestation occurred previous to 1910, before strict legislation was put into place limiting logging operations and agricultural expansion. The most considerable issue concerning deforestation throughout the UnitedStates today comes down to illegal logging carried out by companies who go beyond their allowance of harvest anddisregard the necessary permits. These actions are nearly impossible to monitor or stop and the resulting deforestation has forced the retreat of many animal and plant species, sometimes to the point of extinction.

tentree has partnered with American Forests and Friends of the Wildlife Corridor in an effort to aid in the reforestation of areas in Texas' Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. By purchasing a tentree product, you are reconnecting forest segments by reclaiming agricultural land in order to support the habitat of one of the most biologically diverse areas in all of North America. The valley is home to 530 species of birds, 40 percent of North America's butterfly species, 1,200 plant species, and 17 threatened or endangered animal species, including the ocelot and jaguarundi.

The fragmentation of forested areas has compromised the genetic integrity of many species and, in order for them to continue on in a healthy and self-generating manner, the species will need to be reconnected to their historical range. By reconnecting reclaimed sects of agricultural land within the valley, tentree's intention is to promote the return of many species of animals and plants that have since been uprooted out of the area. With access to a more diverse, healthier gene pool and larger tracts of land, we have full confidence the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge, and those that call it home, will flourish once again.