Better Together – tentree

Take pride by planting in your own backyard with our Better Together Collection

BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA

Who are we planting with?

OneTreePlanted.org and the Forest Carbon Initiative (FCI)

Where are we planting?

The project area is 33 km east of 70 Mile House, British Columbia and was part of the 2017 Elephant Hill Wildfire.

When are we planting?

May, 2018

Why are we planting?

The charred landscape around the lodge will take at least 30 years to regenerate a new crop of seedlings, given the lack of seed trees. This reforestation project will improve the rate of recovery ecologically, and serve as a test bed for remediating other wildfire- affected areas in the Cariboo.

This project will, with the assistance of OneTreePlanted.org and the Forest Carbon Initiative (FCI), re-introduce native tree and plant species into the burned landscape around Siwash Lodge, using a variety of techniques. The project will improve the rate of recovery to forest conditions by reducing the regeneration delay and improving the uniformity of recovery. Other landscape features such as wildlife trees, surviving patches of live timber and coarse woody debris will be incorporated into the plan’s objectives.

MOUNTAIN PARKS, CANADA

Who are we planting with?

Parks Canada

What are we planting?

Whitebark Pine

Where are we planting?

Mountain Parks refers to Jasper, Banff, Mount Revelstoke, Glacier, Yoho, Kootenay and Waterton Lakes National Parks.

When are we planting?

2017, 2018, 2019, 2020

Why are we planting?

The Whitebark Pine is a keystone species that is being killed by a number of causes such as the mountain pine beetle, fire ecology, climate change, and most significantly it was introduced to a disease called blister rust.

To survive, it relies completely on a bird called the Clark's Nutcracker. The tree needs the bird to crack open the pine cone holding its seeds. The nutcracker then holds the seeds in its pouch. It will eat some and hide the rest in the ground to retrieve later on. The seeds that it forgets about are what grow into large whitebark pine.

To recover this endangered species, Parks Canada staff collect seed by climbing trees using ropes and harnesses and then grow the seedlings at nurseries. Planters are hired when the trees are two years old. Parks Canada works with other scientists to test seeds to confirm if the seedlings are resistant to the non-native disease that is killing them.

SASKATCHEWAN, CANADA

Who are we planting with?

Saskatchewan Parks

What are we planting?

Whitebark Pine

Where are we planting?

La Ronge, Saskatchewan

When are we planting?

2016 May / June

Why are we planting?

tentree partnered with the Saskatchewan provincial government on a major project that helped to revitalize Saskatchewan's northern boreal forests. The endeavour came as a result of the 2015 wildfires that caused more than 13,000 evacuations and decimated entire parts of Saskatchewan forests.

SUDBURY, CANADA

Who are we planting with?

The City of Greater Sudbury’s Regreening Program

What are we planting?

28 Native Species

Where are we planting?

City Wide

When are we planting?

Ongoing since 2014

Why are we planting?

Only four decades ago, Sudbury was synonymous with the word ‘moonscape’ and was the butt of many jokes related to the barren landscape left in ruins after the mining boom in the early 19th century. But before the 1870s, old forests dominated by very large white and red pines covered the area. First, lumbering took out the largest trees. Then, the discovery of copper and nickel ore in the 1880s led to the removal of more trees to fuel the smelting of the ore. As a result, over 82,000 hectares (202,630 acres) in Greater Sudbury were left in a barren or semi-barren state.

The City of Greater Sudbury’s (CGS) Regreening Program has been spreading crushed dolomitic limestone since 1978 to decrease soil acidity, helping to make the soil available for the uptake by plants. With reduced sulphur dioxide levels in the air and decreased metal availability in the soil, plants were now able to colonize and grow. Since 1978, the City’s Regreening Program has also planted 9.5 million seedlings of pines and spruces, and, more recently, deciduous trees and shrubs. Recovery of local ecosystems is now underway and young forests are slowly developing across much of Greater Sudbury’s rock barrens.

CAPE BRETON, CANADA

Who are we planting with?

Parks Canada

What are we planting?

Highland Balsam Fir

Where are we planting?

The Skyline Trail, Cape Breton Highlands National Park

When are we planting?

2016 and 2017, Late May / Early June

Why are we planting?

The boreal forest of Cape Breton Highlands National Park is changing. What was once a thriving forest ecosystem is now being replaced by large areas of grass.

The boreal forest is often naturally disturbed by insect outbreaks and fire. When the older mature trees die, they open up the canopy for younger trees to sprout and grow. This continuous cycle of destruction and re-growth is how a healthy boreal forest maintains a natural balance.

Parks Canada’s four-year Bring Back the Boreal project is working to restore the forest health of Cape Breton Highlands National Park. For more information visit www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/plan/foret-forest.aspx

OREGON, SPRINGFIELD USA

Who are we planting with?

One Tree Planted

What are we planting?

White Oak Trees

Where are we planting?

Located at the confluence of the Middle and Coast Fork Willamette Rivers, Dorris Ranch Living History Farm is one of Springfield’s treasured open spaces.

When are we planting?

May 2018

Why are we planting?

Historically, this woodland was dominated by Oregon white oak but over the past century Douglas fir, big leaf maple, Oregon ash and cherry have taken over. These trees were outcompeting the oak trees for sunlight and other important resources and reducing key habitat for species like the acorn woodpecker, nuthatch, northern pygmy owl and western gray squirrel.

To remedy this problem, in fall 2017 we released the oak trees by thinning out the majority of the non-desirable trees. The result is a much more open woodland that will allow the Oregon white oak to receive sufficient sunlight and grow to be healthy, majestic trees.

TEXAS, UNITED STATES

Who are we planting with?

Professional planters and local volunteers including Marines, teachers and students

What are we planting?

8 different native species that include (Huajilo - the honey tree, Devil’s Crew, Torchwood and more)

Where are we planting?

the Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge

When are we planting?

December - March 2016

Why are we planting?

There has been a decrease of around 25% of forested areas in the United States. The most considerable issues concerning deforestation throughout the United States today comes down to illegal logging carried out by companies who go beyond their allowance of harvest and disregard the necessary permits.

tentree has partnered with American Forests and Friends of Wildlife Corridor in an effort to aid in reforestation of areas in Texas’ Lower Rio Grande Valley National Wildlife Refuge. This is one of the most biologically diverse areas in all of North America. Home to 530 species of birds, 40 percent of NA’s North America’s butterfly species, 1,200 plant species and 17 threatened or endangered animal species.